Cybersecurity Agreement 2015

Despite skepticism, the deal has reinforced the discourse on cyberespionage. Every six months, a “hotline” has been set up for emergency communications and meetings to discuss cybersecurity cooperation between senior officials. While measures such as the hotline have been slow, the economic direction of the agreement has given the two countries common ground on which to build. Since then, agreements have been concluded for the organization of seminars on network security and the misuse of technology to commit terrorist acts. How Washington is tackling cyberspace and its 2015 cybersecurity deal with China. The US also has a strong commitment to data protection (but not as much as the European Union, which recently cancelled the US-EU data transfer agreement because it didn`t offer sufficient protection for EU citizens). The activities of government agencies such as the National Security Agency (NSA) in cyberspace have sparked a lively debate in the United States. on how best to reconcile privacy and national security. Finally, Congress abolished the NSA`s mass telephone recording program and replaced it with a limited measure to keep recordings in the hands of telephone companies. The ongoing internal debate on data protection largely influences US policy, but especially when it comes to cyber activities. The cybersecurity deal between the U.S. and China looks promising, but only if there is talk and effort to effectively reduce economic espionage.

Above all, an updated U.S. cybersecurity plan is needed to move forward and work towards better relations with China to reduce cyberespionage. As for future agreements, the agreement between the United States and China, if it proves effective, could serve as a model for future bilateral cybersecurity agreements, as provided for in the Sino-Australian comparison agreement. Was the deal a real breakthrough or simply a tactical maneuver by China, an attempt to prevent Washington from imposing sanctions and disrupting a politically important summit for President Xi? The first round of cyber discussions between the Ministry of Internal Security and the Chinese Ministry of Public Security, in December 2015, received a positive follow-up. The two sides agreed on guidelines for requesting assistance in case of cybercrime or other malicious cyber activities, as well as on the organisation of “tabletop exercises” in spring 2016 and on defining procedures for the use of the hotline. . . .